ArahWeave software for weaving not only makes the fabric simulation image, now in can also wrinkle it for you. The software allows you to load any image and use it as a gray wrinkle map over the fabric. Program will automatically figure out the base gray level of the loaded picture, and will make the fabric both lighter and darker. So the overall colors should not change too much. ArahWeave's finishing simulation works in sequence, so you can have both overprint and wrinkles.
You can use the wrinkle function to make a seersucker simulation. Seersucker is a lightweight fabric made of cotton or artificial fibers with crinkled stripes, made by weaving some of the warp threads slack, and others tight. The result is a unique, puckered effect. You need two warp beams for that, since the warp consumption on straight and wrinkled areas will be different. But with chemical treatment, for example printing with caustic soda, you can make a cheaper imitations of the "real" seersucker.

So how do you do you do this in ArahWeave? Create or load a fabric, to which you want to apply the seersucker look. Than choose Fabric > Simulation. Click the Wrinkle tab.
seersucker

To load the texture, click the Browse button.
seersucker

Double click the image icon to load it into the simulation window. If the image is not gray-scale, the weaving software will automatically converted it to gray-scale. As in overprint, you can specify the Zoom and Strength (intensity) levels. You can also specify the non wrinkable yarns, which allows you to make a realistic seersucker simulations. Wrinkle works differently from overprint, as it takes the color from underlying fabric, and modifies its lightness according to the wrinkle picture/texture.
seersucker

To make the simulation even more realistic, you can set the Displacement parameter, which will curve the threads according to the wrinkle texture.
seersucker

In the shirting gallery, you can check some examples of ArahWeave's seersucker simulations.
Wikipedia has an interesting article on the seersucker fabric, if you want to know more about its history.

In this tutorial, we will explain how to make a complex extra weft (lance) pattern. Let us start with some historical remarks.

We are using an image from a pattern source-book classic: Friderich Fischbach "Ornamente der Gewebe", first published around 1883, color plate number 10.
extra wefts fabric
Fiscbach says that it is a Sicilian-Arabic pattern from 12th century. Curiously, the same pattern appears in M. Dupont-Auberville "L'Ornament des Tissus", first published in Paris in 1877.
extra wefts fabric
Dupont-Auberville claims that the pattern is from 13th century, Sicilian made after genuine Persian models. It is featured on the top of color plate IX.

We have reproduced two details for your enjoyment. It seems that the top (Fiscbach) version is closer to "original", since on the bottom (Auberville) picture, the lion seems to have mutated into a goat, and we have lost the fancy junction between the circles. We use this sample to remind ourselves of a couple of things: In textile design, the notion of original is quite shady - copying, borrowing, stealing - is the norm, not the exception. But you can not copy the quality, at least not without a considerable expense. Let us hope to see the return of the days, when customers were able to recognize the quality, and were not just blindly following brand names, thus demonstrating their ignorance. Secondly, we see that patterns are able to spread across cultures like a virus. The stylized Arabic script was fashionable even at the height of the crusades. In those times, Europeans were the poor peasants, trying to copy the "superior cultures" of the East. And we have never paid any royalties ;-)

End of historical remarks.

We will develop this pattern first as a simple damask, then we will embellish it with colorful extra wefts. We start with a scanned image, and we reduce the number of colors to just two. The size of the image should be calculated with respect of warp and weft density and desired size of the design. We will use warp density of 64 ends/cm and 34 picks/cm for weft.
extra wefts fabric

We use just two colors for damask: one for warp and the other for weft effect. Besides, it is also easier and faster to draw a jacquard image with only two colors. If you need more, you can use fill with color tool in ArahPaint, and you have new arrangement in a few seconds. We will not cover the drawing and cleaning up of the scanned image, you should be able to do this by now. Open ArahWeave program. Choose Weave > Jacquard conversion. Load the image in Jacquard conversion window in Images > Load image. Select a suitable weave for each color and press OK.
extra wefts fabric

The program will replace colors with selected weaves: it will generate a jacquard weave. You get a simple fabric with two weaves: warp and weft satin effect.
extra wefts fabric

And here is the simulation...
extra wefts fabric

If you decide that this fabric is too dull, you can make it more interesting by using extra wefts. This means that we use several wefts, but only on places, where we need them for the color effect. This technique requires the use of regulator or variable weft density. When the regulator is active, the warp beam does not advance, and we effectively double the weft density on that point of the fabric. Of course, the weaves must also be appropriate - we must "force" the picks to go on top of each other by using appropriate weaves. For example, weft satin for the pick that needs to be on the top, and warp satin for the pick that needs to be on the back. If you will use plain weave for both picks, the threads will compete for space on the top, and you will not be able to weave with the desired density.

Open ArahPaint, load the image, select "fill with color" tool, and change color in picture details, which should have a different color than the ground. Then load the image in Jacquard conversion window. Select Extra wefts as the type of conversion; it is an option button on the left bottom of the window. Set System to 3 since we will use three different wefts in this fabric: one for ground, and two for the red and yellow extra wefts. You have to load three weaves for every color in image - one for every weft. We will use same weaves as in previous fabric. For attachment wefts on the back side of the fabric, you should choose a weave with longer floats than basic weft weave. Satin 40 will work well, since we have a high density in warp. We also need to explain the meaning of the three weaves for each color: In the first row we have the weaves for the ground weft, the next row shows first extra weft weaves, and the last one shows second extra weft weaves.
extra wefts fabric

After you have loaded all weaves and set all the parameters, click OK and you will get the full jacquard weave. Program will multiply the weft size by 3, but will be smart enough not to insert weaves where they are not necessary. For this reason, we need to remove the unneeded wefts, which are floating across the full width of the fabric. The function is in Weave > Edit > Jacquard > Remove extra warps/wefts (or click icon in the Jacquard conversion window. At this point you will arrive at the final size of weave. The program automatically writes the correct weft pattern and puts the regulator on the appropriate positions.
extra wefts fabric

Usually, if your weave selection is good, you will not have to spend a lot of time correcting the long floats. Remember that warp long floats across wefts with regulator will not have the same length as the ones across the ground fabric without any extra wefts.

Now you have fabric with two extra wefts, yellow and red. To make even fancier fabric, you can replace the solid ground weft with a more complex weft pattern. You can change weft pattern by writing new pattern in Edit warp and weft pattern window. The other way is to select a weft from Edit warp and weft pattern and draw it in fabric with left mouse button. As you click it, you will see that the mouse pointer color and shape will change to small shuttle. Then just click in the fabric and draw by pressing left mouse button. If you keep it pressed, it will continue to draw. The fabric will change in real time and the "complicated" warp or weft pattern will be written automatically. You can use the same procedure for changing warp, the only difference is, that the mouse pointer will change to yarn cone.
extra wefts fabric

To avoid streaking because of uneven yarn, you can divide ground weft (a) across several cones. After choosing Tools > Split/merge weft, the window with this title will pop up. If you enter yarns adef, and only yarn a is used in the fabric, then weft pattern will be rewritten, so that yarn a will be split evenly among yarns a, d, e, f. You can use this function for other wefts too.
extra wefts fabric

If you want to have yarns sorted in order, so that the first yarn in the fabric is marked with a, second with b etc., choose Tools > Sort from the Edit warp and weft pattern window. The yarns will change the positions and the warp/weft pattern will be automatically re-written.
extra wefts fabric

To get the simulation, you have to enable Set weaving density > Density from technical data and you have to set the correct parameters in Thread pattern > Consumption.
extra wefts fabric

To check the fabric on the back side activate function Fabric > Reverse.
extra wefts fabric

Now you have to prepare your sample for weaving. In Weave > Save cards for production you have to insert the layout according to your jacquard and loom. Be sure to set the correct number of hooks and Weft bytes with regulator on correct bit, according to the specifications of your loom.
extra wefts fabric

Before saving you can check cards preview, if everything is on correct places. We use color preview in this case, so that we can understand it more easily. At the end of file on gray background you can see the weft change and regulator on the positions as we have defined them in Save cards for production window. Note that we have split the ivory ground weft into a,b,c,d, the yellow into f,and g, while the red is using only one weft selector on e. The regulator is on three consecutive points, as requested by Grosse specifications. Your loom may require a different layout. Careful observers will note another little trick - the selvedge is elongated where the regulator is active: in this way we are sure that the extra wefts will enter in selvedge.
extra wefts fabric

That's all folks!

In the previous tutorial, we have developed a Thai fabric with one extra warp across the whole fabric width. Actually, it was a fabric with two warp beams, where odd warps were on first warp beam, and even wefts were on second warp beam. This is necessary in weaving, since the warp threads (ends), which weave with a very different weave, also have very different warp consumption. In such cases, as you weave on, the differences in warp consumption begins to build up, and you are unable to weave, if you have all the threads on the same warp. The threads in first warp beam weave in plain weave, while the figuring threads in second warp beam weave with much longer floats, especially in the back, so they consume less yarn.

The second Thai fabric, which we will explain in this tutorial, has three warps: one is plain weave, second is figuring warp in gold, and the third one is extra warp in various colors. First warp can be prepared on one warp beam, and the other two warps can be together in the same warp beam, since their warp consumption is not so different.
extra warps fabric

The fabric on the above picture is slightly rotated and wrinkled, so you will know that it is not an ArahWeave simulation ;-) A detailed look below will help you in understanding the fabric structure. The red rectangle in the previous picture indicates the position of the zoomed area on the next picture.
extra warps fabric

Open ArahWeave software for weaving. We again start with a base design, which actually depicts the pattern of second (gold) warp. The easiest way to draw it is to use ArahWeave's weave editor. You can first draw the dobby card, since this gives you total control over the number of shafts, and then make a weave by drawing the drafting.
extra warps fabric

Then you can extend the design by drawing the drafting, using only 14 shafts and your imagination.
extra warps fabric

In this kind of fabric, three or four warp threads usually weave in the same way, so that we can get a bigger repeat without increasing the number of shafts. In this example, we need to multiply warp points by three in some areas of design, and multiply by four in other areas.
To multiply weave points, choose Change > Insert/delete warp/wefts... in the Edit weave window. You need to choose directions of multiplying (warp or weft), and select the area at which you want to multiply the points. You can do it by middle mouse button in the weave editor, or parametrically, by entering the starting point and the size of selection. The two lines in magenta colors indicate the selected area. As you change the starting point or the size, magenta lines also change the position. Finally, enter the multiplying factor (Times), and the program calculates the new size.
extra warps fabric

Click the OK button, and the weaving software will resize the whole weave by the number of multiplying points. You can still go back, if you click the Undo/Redo icon in this window.
extra warp fabric

Now we continue with the next area, which needs multiplying, this time by four.
extra warp fabric

After clicking OK, you are one step closer to the big basic weave.
extra warp fabric

On the far right of design, we have another long section, where we need to multiply the points by four. The exact parameters are visible on the next picture.
extra warp fabric

Now we have the whole golden warp part of design. Later in the process we need to repeat the first part of the design 30 times, and the middle part 7 times, as the image indicates. We will not do this just yet, since we need to insert the third warp in those areas.
extra warp fabric

We have to construct a double weave from plain weave and golden warp motif. We will use a shortcut to insert a motif weave into double weave editor without saving it, and without any calculation of double weave size.
Once again the weave editor's power function Insert/delete warp/wefts comes to the rescue. Multiply the whole weave by two, From 1, while Size is 882, as you can see size in the title of the weave editor.
extra warp fabric

After clicking OK in the Insert/delete warp/wefts window, chose Change > Edit decomposed. Enter warp layout: 2, since we have one ground and one extra warp. The weave is divided into two identical weaves. We need to delete the content of first part of the weave; select it with mouse click, and click on in the Edit decomposed window.
extra warp fabric

Then load or draw the plain weave into the empty weave. It is easy to draw weaves with a small repeat in the Edit decomposed window - to make the plain weave, just draw two points in the lower left corner, and click with the middle mouse button on the last point of the repeat (at the mouse position: 2,2).
extra warp fabric

The weaving software extends the weave to the whole area - in our case to 882x80. Next picture shows the resulting weave. Decomposed editor is on the top, and normal weave editor is in the background, and they both show the same weave in two different ways:
extra warp fabric

Next image shows fabric simulation of the current design. Up to now, this fabric is not too different from the fabric explained in the previous tutorial. But now the real fun begins. Arrows show the position of the third extra warp, which we still need to insert. This is more tricky, since these warps will only be present in certain areas, not across the full fabric width.
extra warp fabric

Before inserting threads, we need to take care of a few details: denting should have the same repeat size as the weave in warp direction. So instead simple denting of 2, we must modify the denting field into 882(2), which means 882 dents with 2 threads per dent, so that the total repeat has 1764 threads. We have a similar situation with warp pattern: instead 1 repeat of 1A1B, the pattern should be 882(1A1B). We had to make these two modifications to correct all the repeats (weave, denting, warp pattern), so that the program can fix everything as we insert the threads.

Then select a yarn in the warp threads bar from the Edit warp and weft pattern window (the green thread with letter C). We will use thread insert mode, which makes space for the selected thread in a weave, extend the denting, and insert the thread into the warp pattern. ArahWeave enables you to make all three modifications with one operation: Shift + left mouse click on the space in the thread pattern (warp or weft) bar in the weave editor.
extra warp fabric

After clicking, you get an extra green thread in the thread pattern, space in the weave editor, and extended dent (3 threads per dent instead of 2).
extra warp fabric

Now just proceed with the thread insertion: we need 9 additional threads in that area.
extra warp fabric

We must add extra warp in four different areas within the fabric. Use a different yarn color for each area, so that you will better distinguish the areas.
extra warp fabric

Since the inserted threads are all in weft effect (white), we need to invert the weave (change black points to white points) in order to see the inserted threads in the fabric simulation.
extra warp fabric

The above simulation is just to help you understand what is going on. If you really did invert the weave, now invert it back to get to the original situation.

Now we have to draw weave points (stitching) for extra warps, which we have inserted.
extra warp fabric

Sometimes it is easier to draw the weave in the color mode, enable it in View > Yarn colors. We will draw just a few points in the weave editor, and finish the work in the decomposed editor, since it will be faster.
extra warp fabric

You should finish drawing the extra warp weave in the following manner:
extra warp fabric

Now select Change > Edit decomposed from a menu in the weave editor. In the newly opened window, change the type of Warp layout into Yarns. Weave will be divided into 6 areas, one for each used yarn. All the yarns of the same color are grouped into the same block.
extra warps fabric

Since the weave is equal for all the extra warp colors (we will use just 2 shafts for them), you can copy the green warp weave into the blue warp area. To copy a weave, click with the right mouse button into the area, into which you want to copy the selected weave.
extra warps fabric

You can also copy it to the blue extra warp, which has 12 threads. It does not fit, but we have a good starting point for manual correction.
extra warps fabric

Now correct the weave in the blue area and copy it to the red warp area.
extra warps fabric

Authors of this tutorial are afraid that you are confused. Where are we? Why are we doing this? Not to worry. The following picture shows the current design stage. We have finished drawing the weave, now we have to repeat the first part six times, and the middle part seven times.
extra warps fabric

You may think that this tutorial is all about the Insert/delete warps/wefts tool. Not far from the truth. As a matter of fact, we needed to enhance this tool, so that such a fabric would be easier to develop.

Therefore you should again choose Change > Insert/delete warp/wefts.... Select the Repeat mode, check Warp/weft pattern and Denting, so that both warp pattern and denting pattern will be repeated. Define the area you want to repeat, either parametric in the From and Size fields, or click middle mouse button, and drag the mouse to select the area. Type the number of repeats in the Times field. If you want to have 6 repeats of the section, you should set Times to 5, since the program will add 5 repeats to existing one. So all together you will get six repeats.
extra warps fabric

Repeat procedure in the middle part. Here you need 6 additional repeats.
extra warps fabric

Now things are finally taking shape. Next picture shows the current stage of the fabric. We have to replace the green and magenta threads, which we got by multiplication, with the colored threads in sequence equal to the original fabric (see the beginning of the tutorial).
extra warps fabric

We will recolor the yarns by drawing with mouse. ArahWeave's protected yarns will be of great help here. Make white and yellow yarn protected by double mouse click (the yarn color letter will be crossed out), and select the blue yarn drawing color (letter D in the image).
extra warps fabric

The shape of the pointer changes to the cone . Now click, hold, and drag the mouse over the green yarns. Since the white and yellow warp threads (ends) are protected, they won't be modified. You can freely draw with the mouse over the fabric simulation, without worrying of making any damage to the fabric.
extra warps fabric

Then select another yarn color, for example green, draw it in the fabric, and so on.
extra warps fabric

Now go to the second repeated section, and replace the magenta threads.
extra warps fabric

Now we have to repeat first part of design ...
extra warps fabric

... using Insert/delete warps/wefts.
extra warps fabric

The design is almost finished.
extra warps fabric

But the original fabric has an additional twist. As the great philosopher said: "The devil is in the details." A closer examination of the photography of the fabric's edge proves that there are also areas without the yellow warp. The fun is not over yet.
extra warps fabric

Once again we will use mouse, but this time to eliminate the unnecessary threads. Use Shift + right mouse click on the yarn in the warp pattern strip below in the weave editor. The weaving software will remove the thread from the dent, weave, and warp pattern, all at once. Correcting each of them individually would be quite difficult, at this stage of pattern complexity.
extra warps fabric

After removing some of the yellow threads, the right hand side of the weave looks like this:
extra warps fabric

On the complete right, you also see the final dobby card, just 18 shafts and 80 wefts.

Here is the fabric simulation zoomed out at 20% (5 times smaller than real size).
extra warps fabric

Next picture shows the fabric simulation at 80% zoom level.
extra warps fabric

We will not even attempt to show the complete weave in this case, since it is too big even with compression of the repeating areas. Anyway, only the dobby card shown above is needed for weaving. The other two pieces of informations to pass the design into production are warp pattern and denting pattern. We leave these two as an exercise to the reader ;-) If you just repeat the above steps using ArahWeave, you will find them in the appropriate fields of the program, or on the printout of the fabric production data as HTML. Note that you need at least ArahWeave Personal Edition to actually save such a fabric. The demo version will allow you to make all these operations, but you will not be able to save all the data about the fabric, since WIF fabric format, used by the demo version, does not support denting. It is time to buy ArahWeave, if you are serious about weaving.

This fabric was initially developed without a CAD, we have just shown how to make it in ArahWeave software for weaving. Once again, we must admire Thai ingenuity!

And finally, we wish to thank Mr. Weera Schwaleemapron, president of the Thai Weaving Industry Association, who gave us the fabric, so we could do this exercise in the first place.

We will start this tutorial with a book recommendation. It is entitled Swatches: A Sourcebook of Patterns with More Than 600 Fabric Designs, by Dorsey Sitley Adler and Robert D. Adler. We should also thank the Powells bookstore in Portand, Oregon for having such a huge collection of books on their shelves, available for everyone to browse. You can buy the book here. The Swatches book contains pictures of many beautiful dobby and jacquard fabrics, and we have chosen to use ArahWeave software to simulate a fabric with space dyed yarns. You will find it in the book on page 153.
table cloth with space dyed yarn

Open ArahWeave software for weaving and load (or create) a plaid fabric, in which you want to use fancy yarns. It should not be too difficult to change the weave to plain weave, and to write the warp and weft pattern. If you have problems with warp/weft pattern, you will be able to read it towards the end of this tutorial.
table cloth with space dyed yarn

Choose Fabric > Yarns. Select a yarn, which you want to edit. It is a good idea to set all the yarn parameters (count) for the yarn, which is most similar to the yarn you want to draw (like for example, melange), and then switch Model from Simple to Custom. If you want to use more colors in the yarn, modify the number of colors.
table cloth with space dyed yarn

Then click on the Draw yarn button, and the Draw yarn window pops up.
table cloth with space dyed yarn

It would be time consuming to draw all the twists and shades of the yarn, so first choose Edit > Clear shades. The weaving software will do the shades.
table cloth with space dyed yarn

Since we want to make slub (or flamme) yarn, we have to make space (make the basic yarn thiner) in the drawing area. Choose diameter 2 as the pen size, and click the icon. It will thin the yarn for the number of points of the currently selected pen size.
table cloth with space dye yarn

The information about the yarn repeat is written below colors. Simple yarns need one only one yarn twist of repeat. So the length of the yarn repeat is currently only 16 pixels, which means 0.593 millimeters at this yarn count. We need to increase the length of repeat of the fancy yarn, to match the yarn length used in the fabric. So we need to modify the length parameter. Each time you increase the length by 1, the length doubles. When we reach the desired value at about 38 millimeters, we can start with drawing.
table cloth with space dyed yarn

Select the second color (red) and change drawing tool from free hand to rectangle . Let's say that the length of color effect is 10 mm. Start to draw at distance 10 mm with left mouse button click, and drag a mouse to 20 mm (you can check this on the ruler).
table cloth with space dyed yarn

If you need to delete any points with background color, just draw with right mouse button. You can also draw nicer transitions of the color effect by drawing over the borders with the spray tool. Don't worry about the dotty appearance of the yarn, it will all look nice once you view it at 1:1 in the final fabric.
table cloth with space dyed yarn

Now we need just to add new life to our yarn by Edit > Add top/bottom shades and Edit > Add twist.
table cloth with space dyed yarn

You can now close the Draw yarn window. In the main Yarns window you can see the preview of the yarn. You can also save the yarn for future use.
table cloth with space dyed yarn

If you wish to change the colors of the yarn, you can do this in the Colors window (Fabric > Colors). First click on the yarn sub-color you want to change in the bottom right angle of the window. Then select the color from the color palette, and copy it with right mouse button into the yarn table.
table cloth with space dyed yarn

After setting the thread pattern (Fabric > Thread pattern)
table cloth with space dyed yarn

... and density (Fabric > Density)
table cloth with space dyed yarn

... you get the ArahWeave's fabric simulation. We didn't care to match the colors from the fabric in the book, since colors were changed in printing anyway. But the fabric structure and texture are there, don't you agree?
table cloth with space dyed yarn

A careful observer will also notice, that this fabric does not have a repeat, since each square is different. If you plan to use such a pattern with a texture mapping program like ArahDrape, make sure you generate several warp/weft pattern repeats of the texture. In this way you will diminish the ugly repeat errors on the borders of the "repeat". ArahWeave's printouts, on the other hand, will always be perfect, since the full fabric printout area is always calculated, not just one repeat.

Buyers who know something about fabrics, know that dobby fabrics are simple, while jacquards are complicated, and require costly machinery to manufacture. So they can accept a higher price of a jacquard fabric. But sometimes we can trick the "experts". We will make a jacquard-like fabric on a dobby loom with ArahWeave software for weaving. One way of making such fabrics in ArahWeave is explained in creation of the traditional Thai fabric, depicted below (detail). Such techniques are often employed in traditional weaving, where human ingenuity is used to exceed limits of technology.
extra warps fabric

When we design this kind of fabrics for the dobby loom, we must all the time think about the total number of shafts. We can develop complicated design using operations, which do not increase the number of shafts.

This fabric has two warps, one is plain weave, and the other is figuring warp in gold. The pattern of figuring warp, controlled by the weave, is quite complex. We also have a long, but not complicated weft pattern.

To simplify the construction of this fabric, we will first make two separate fabrics, and then later join them into the final fabric. First fabric will contain the violet part, and the second one will contain the green and orange areas.

First part of design

Start with a base design, which actually depicts the pattern of second (gold) warp. The easiest way to draw it is to use ArahWeave's weave editor. Since we have a pointed draft pattern, just draw half of design (or dobby card), and the rest will be filled in as you draw the drafting.
edit weave with ArahWeave software for weaving

In this kind of fabric, three or four warp threads usually weave in the same way, so that we can get a bigger repeat without increasing the number of shafts. We need to multiply warp points by three. Later, we will also multiply the points in weft direction by two, so that the whole figure will keep some proportion with respect to initial image. There are several ways to multiply the weave, the fastest is by using Change > Insert/delete warp/wefts... You have to make a selection (click and drag with middle mouse button), in the area which you want to multiply. In our case, this is the whole width. Program draws green lines to indicate the affected area, then set the parameters (Warp, Multiply, Times) as shown on the image below. The red rectangle just indicates the selection, which we made to define the multiplication area.
edit weave with ArahWeave software for weaving

After clicking OK, you get the following situation:
edit weave with ArahWeave software for weaving

Then multiply the wefts in the same manner:
edit Weave with ArahWeave software for weaving

Now save the weave, since this is just a motif, used for construction of the double weave, which makes our first fabric. The size of the base weave is 90x64 points. You will get the final double weave by interleaving base motif and plain weave. Clear the weave editor's content by clicking on , and change the repeat size to 180x64. Chose Change > Edit decomposed. Enter warp layout: 2, since we have one ground and one extra warp. In the first part load or draw the plain weave. It is easy to draw weaves with small repeat in the Edit decomposed window - for plain weave just draw two points and click with middle mouse button on the last point of the repeat (at mouse position 2,2), and program will extend the weave to the whole area - in our case to 90x64. In the second part load the basic motif weave, which you have saved previously. You will get the following weave (Decomposed editor is shown on top of normal weave editor, they show the same weave in two different ways):
weaving software ArahWeave

Once you do Dobby > Check weave > Optimize the number of shafts, you will know that at least 17 shafts are necessary to weave this fabric:
weave editor in ArahWeave software for weaving

You can now switch to the integer view of the fabric in main window, set warp/weft colors and enter warp pattern of 1A1B, while weft pattern has only one color, so a weft pattern of 1a is enough.
extra warp fabric in ArahWeave software for weaving

Save this fabric with a new name, we are ready to make the next fabric.

Second part of design

We will make the second fabric as using a similar procedure as for the first one, and then join them using function Weft blanket, into the final fabric. The base design for second part should have same width (number of threads) and we should use the same or very similar drafting, so we avoid introducing new shafts.
extra warps fabric

This is the multiplied motif:
extra warps fabric

As with the previous weave, we will make a combination of plain weave and base motif to get the double warp weave:
extra warps fabric

Warp pattern is the same as before (1A1B), but you need to change the weft pattern to get stripes (6a 90b 6a).
extra warps fabric

Now save the second fabric with a new name.

Final design

In the last stage of making this particular fabric, we will join both fabrics, which we made earlier, into one design. The image below shows the structure of the final fabric, which we want to achieve.
extra warps fabric

Again, there are more ways to do it, but the most elegant is to use the unique ArahWeave's feature, called Weft blanket. It was initially conceived as a sampling tool, but now many designers use it as a pure design tool for combining different fabrics into one design. In the main ArahWeave window choose Blanket > Weft blanket.
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In the Weft blanket window set the number of fabrics you will use. We have 9 fabric sections. You should load fabrics in the Weft blanket window in the correct order, and for each fabric part, you should enter desired number of wefts (picks). On the figure below, we have selected the fabric number 4, and it has 102 wefts. On the right column you can preview the transition between two fabrics, and if you need, you can move beginning of each fabric, by modifying the first weft. The indication of fabric junction shows first the weave, and then the integer fabric simulation, so you can control both the weave transition, as the weft color transition.
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After clicking OK, you instantly get the final fabric in the main window. Here is a zoomed out simulation of the whole fabric:
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...and this is a detail at 100% (1:1 view):
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One more hint: You may want to change shafts' order, so that ground shafts (plain weave) will be together. That means that we want to exchange shaft number 2 and shaft number 3. To do this, go in weave editor, press Shift on the keyboard and click with the middle mouse button at any intersection point of the second and the third shaft. One such point is marked with red x on the image below.
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This is the corrected dobby weave, which will make more sense in production.
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And finally, not for the faint of heart, the full weave:
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This fabric was initially developed without a CAD, we have just shown how to make it in ArahWeave. Quite a feat!